Looking For The Perfect Gift?

Still looking for the perfect gift for that outdoorsman?   Something that he or she will cherish during their many years in the woods, fields and on the water?   Something with such lasting quality and function that it will be passed on to future generations and cherished by others still yet to come?

I say get that sportsman on your list a Buck #110 Folding Hunter knife.   And this year…up until December 31st, you can pick up the 50th Anniversary edition of this knife which makes it even more special.   Check it out HERE.   Okay, I’ll be quite honest with you.   That link shows the knife for purchase directly from the factory, but if you’re lucky around the holidays you can find it for about half that price.   That’s what I did a few weeks ago.

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Still not convinced?   Check out this quick video to give you a bit more background on the Buck story.

I probably have purchased more Buck knives than from any other knife company out there.   Oh, I know some folks have their favorites and it might be some other brand.   But I honestly feel you will not get a better value for the money than a knife from Buck.   I have abused my knifes from time to time and they have broken off tips, etc.   I send them back to the company and they don’t just replace your broken knife with a new one–they fix your old knife because they understand it has sentimental value.

So, if you’re completely at a loss on what to get the sportsman in your life…I have just given you the best idea I can think of.   What’s that you say…they already have a knife?   No worries.   I have yet to find a sportsman who has too many knives, flashlights, guns, caps, boots…oh, the list can go on.

The Role Mice Play In Our Outdoor Lives.

Mice.

Can’t say I love them.   Yet, I don’t have the desperate fear of the existence like some folks I know.   My wife, in particular.

If you enjoy the outdoors the time will eventually come when you must deal with mice.   Granted, they can be a real pain in the ass.   Take, for instance, the mice that invaded an old hunting truck I used to own.   One day I was driving along with the heater blasting to take the chill out of the air.   Suddenly, what once was nice comforting heat transformed to smoke and a truck that was in serious trouble.   I immediately turned the truck off suspecting an electrical problem of some kind.   Nope…just mice that built a nest that started on fire.   Little bastards!!

I’ll never forget a bear hunting trip about 25 years ago with a close friend staying in an old (mostly abandoned) farm house.   The house seen human occupants just a few weeks each year during hunting seasons.   On the other hand, the full-time residents were various vermin ranging from mice to…well, I don’t care to dwell on that.   Suffice it to say sleeping at night was interesting.   You could hear the faint pitter patter of feet across the old linoleum floor all night long.   Even worse, those little rascals had no regard for a person sleeping as they zipped across the bed sheets tickling a person’s torso.

By all accounts this depicts a good day on the mouse trapline.

By all accounts this depicts a good day on the mouse trapline.

Yeah.   Mice are sure fun.   The only good mouse is a dead mouse used for fox bait.   And trying to eradicate them from anywhere can be challenging as any hunt you might take on.   I’ve used snap traps, poison, ultrasonic sound, even pails with spinny pop bottles to teach them a lesson.   To some extent all those methods work, but none of them is the perfect answer.

Particularly frustrating for me is keeping mice out of my boat during winter storage.   I’ve used moth balls, I used packs filled with dried mint leaves.   Nothing is foolproof.   The little rascals get in all my compartments and make a mess.   In my glove box they shred anything that is chewable and seem to have a good time doing it.   Worse yet, they pee and poop on everything.   Once they stake their claim to your property nothing can be deemed clean anymore.

Yet, to many people mice are much more than just an occasional nuisance.   I’ve known women AND MEN who shriek at the mere sight of a mouse running loose.   Somehow their life can be in perfect control one minute, but add a mouse to the picture and all chaos breaks out.

Another one bites the dust!  The days are over for this little bastard getting into mischief.

Another one bites the dust! The days are over for this little bastard getting into mischief.

Case in point, two years ago we went on a family vacation to a resort for some fishing and relaxing for a week.   That goal was achieved until about the 5th  night in when a mouse was witnessed scurrying along a wall.   The next morning when the office opened my wife was complaining how our cabin was overrun with pestilence.   Amazingly, we had existed in the cabin for several days with no sightings…but eventually all good things come to an end.

Yup, and so did the trip.   We were packed and on our way headed back home a day early thanks to a furry little mammal weighing a few ounces.   Indeed, the mere presence of a mouse can profoundly impact many good plans.

So, tell me about your adventures with mice.   Do you have a good story?   How have mice or other rodents impacted your outdoor experiences?   In particular, if you have a funny incident we absolutely must hear about that.

Amateur Radios In The Great Outdoors

Over the past few months this blog has suffered due to a lack of posts.   The culprit?   A slight preoccupation with a new hobby that I believe has great potential in the outdoors.   Let me explain.

Several weeks back I read a blog post that tweaked my interest.   That post, along with several others like this one, helped me add a new hobby to my répertoire.   The hobby?   Amateur radio.   Now, I know what you are probably thinking.   Ham radios are for geeks who are into an old electronics hobby fast becoming outdated due to technology.   Well, while some parts of that statement might indeed ring true, such a broad characterization is completely wrong.

My mobile radio can easily reach repeaters 40 or more miles away.  With proper linking, however, it can talk to stations located all around the world.

My mobile radio can easily reach repeaters 40 or more miles away. With proper linking, however, it can talk to stations located all around the world.

What if I told you that while on your next Colorado elk hunt you could have communications virtually anywhere you go.   I’m not talking satellite communications costing $1 or more a minute.   Nope, I’m talking good old fashioned modulated radio waves using technology that has helped win wars, save lives and been around for over 100 years.   Potentially, that same technology could allow your spouse to use their smart phone and talk with you on a handheld transceiver clear across the country.   Would I get your attention then?

The deeper I got into “ham” or amateur radio the more intrigued I got with its potential in many facets of life, particularly the outdoors.   With the right equipment, the right skills and privileges, the potential exists to communicate anywhere on the globe.

I’m not really intending for this blog post to be a primer on amateur radio here in the U.S., but here are some points you should know:

  • Essentially there are three levels of amateur radio the FCC recognizes (Technician-which is entry level, General-which provides nearly all bands of radio frequency communication, and Extra-which is sort of a master level giving all privileges possible under U.S. amateur radio communications law)
  • To get your Technician certification the cost currently is $15 and requires a person to pass a 35 multiple-choice question test (must score 26 or more correct to pass)
  • NO MORSE CODE.  That’s right…you don’t have to learn a new language as was once required.
  • Books are available for self-instruction.  Classes are also given for those who wish to learn in that manner.
  • For the most part, Hams are a friendly bunch willing to help you out when you get into a bind.
  • Now for the somewhat controversial statement in the Ham world.   Radios can be purchased for as little as around $35 so the hobby doesn’t need to cost you big dollars to get going.

Well, my investment was mostly just time.   Yup, I studied for the Technician level back in May and found I wanted to go a bit beyond that.   I got “the bug” and wanted to learn more.   So, a few weeks ago I tested for my General level and that is now where I am content to be.   A full fledged new Ham with lots of fun in store developing this new hobby.

Of course, I’m certainly not advocating the use of radios while hunting or in the pursuit of game.   No, my intention is how this technology can be used for hunting camps to stay in touch with one another or hunters to stay in touch with family back home.   Some of these radios even have the ability to track a sportsman allowing a family not only to talk to them, but to know where they are at all times for safety reasons.

Handheld transceivers (HTs) can be easily packed into remote areas of the outdoors for reliable communication. Often times more reliable than cellular phones.

Handheld transceivers (HTs) can be easily packed into remote areas of the outdoors for reliable communication. Often times more reliable than cellular phones.

If you want to explore the world of amateur radios a bit more now is the perfect time to check it out.   Each year during the fourth weekend in June there’s an event called ARRL Field Day taking place in locations around the country.   Check out this map for a location near you.   The Field Day (which actually lasts for 24 hours) is sort of a fun contest where ham clubs gather and test out new equipment, attempt to make as many contacts (around the world) with other folks, but mostly they are there to show potential new hams this fabulous hobby.

Many of these Field Days coming up this weekend will even have GOTA (Get On The Air) possibilities where you can try things out under the tutelage of an experienced ham operator and ask questions.   I strongly encourage you even if this only mildly sparks an interest to go check it out.   You might discover a great new adventure awaits you that can easily be enjoyed during your time in the outdoors.

That’s it for now.   I bid you 73s de K0AOM…clear and off the air.